Paul Goldstein

Sculptor

“I came very late to sculpture. When I turned 60, I stopped what I was doing and went to live in Bangkok, Thailand for one year. There I worked in an old brass foundry well known for making Buddhas and temple bells in the old traditional Thai way.”

“I prefer working in clay, then casting the figure in bronze. I find there is a simplified realism to my work. I am completely self taught. I have always had a strong interest in ancient and contemporary cultures, not only in the Americas but from around the world which finds its way into my work. Because I started so late in life creating sculptures, I am more interested in producing a variety of prototypes with different styles than marketing my work. I enjoy exploring and using new materials and developing new techniques.”

photo: Androu Morgan
We are extremely pleased to offer a few limited edition pieces from local sculptor, Paul Goldstein. Paul, a long-time supporter of our organization, is donating his artwork to BMKF to help us raise funds for our scholarships. 100% of the proceeds raised from the sale of these featured sculptures will go to the young women we are supporting. Thank you, Mr. Goldstein!

1. Thai Wedding Dolls (Swans)

“There are no such things as Thai Wedding Dolls. I borrowed the idea from Indonesia using the traditional ancient Thai figure of Hong (swan) and knowing that swans mate for life created these Thai Wedding Dolls. They are bronze with a gold patina in edition of 10. Only three remain.”

Dimensions: 1 1/2″ w x 1″ d x 3″ h. Price: $150/pair

2. Namaste: Plastic and Bronze editions.

“In western Nepal you will find small wooden guardian figures in fields near homes and bridges left exposed to the elements. I was fascinated how anatomically incorrect they were and decided to make my own version of them. I have also appreciated the traditional Nepalese greeting of Namaste which is often accompanied with a beautiful smile. I have studied Buddhist sculpture and am drawn especially to Lao Buddha images and having seen children sleeping in doorways in Kathmandu this all seems to come together in this sculpture.” Namaste is only available through the Foundation and it comes in both plastic and bronze editions. The plastic edition is painted while the bronze edition has a heat patina.

Plastic and bronze dimensions: 4″w x 4′ d x 11″ h. Price: Namaste plastic $150 Namaste bronze $750.


Sold.


3. The Lotus Blossom: Bronze

“The small bronze sculpture is based on a young Thai Buddhist nun whom I saw at Wat Pho in Bangkok. I elongated the traditional robes worn by Thai nuns (usually white in color) to resemble an unfurling lotus leaf. She is holding an open lotus leaf in her hand. The lotus leaf is an important symbol in Buddhism representing enlightenment. You normally do not see a young woman as a nun in Thai society.”

Dimensions: 5″ w x 3 1/2″ d x 16″ h. This is the last of a very small edition of three that I made and will make no more. Price: $1,000


4. Overturning the Bowl: Artist’s proof.

“Overturning the bowl prevents a person from making merit which is an important integral part of Buddhism. Burmese monks used this gesture which is considered by many Buddhists to be a violent act to get the junta generals to reflect on what they were doing to the Burmese people. This was my first large sculpture and is based on the smaller Lotus Blossom sculpture that I previously made. It is a portrait of a Burmese nun wearing a traditional pink robe. I usually make a plastic cast in order to clean out the clay residue when I make my molds. It also ensures that I can make another mold if anything ever happens to the original mold as well as giving me an opportunity to play with various patinas. The single bronze version was sold as I do a very limited or often one of a kind bronze sculpture. This is my artist’s proof and is made of plastic and will be the only one.”

Dimensions: 11′ w x 11″ d x 32″ H. Price: $500


5. Honey Hunter of Nepal.

36″W x 42″ H x 18″ D.
Silicon Bronze
Only one made
Price: $4,500
All proceeds go to the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation

Photo credit: Androu Morgan


Anna Witte

www.annawitte.org

Ms. Witte’s art sample:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2GVGelKPek

20% from Ms. Witte’s art bought through referrals from the BMKF directly supports the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation Scholarships. Contact us for more details.

About the Artist

Anna Witte is an award-winning children’s book writer, illustrator and storyteller. She has a doctorate in Spanish and Latin American Literature from the University of Texas at Austin, and teaches language, literature and drama at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is a world language storyteller for the King County Library System.

Ray Lawrence Edwards

About the Artist

Ray Lawrence Edwards was a dedicated Oregon artist who started his career in the late 1960s as a bronze sculptor in Eugene, Oregon. From the mid-1980s to 2005 he lived in San Rafael, California where he created most of the paintings presented in his website’s galleries. Ray moved back to Oregon in 2005 and retired in Lincoln City where he lived the last few years of his life.

Ray passed away in February 2010 and his art is now being offered to the public by his heir, BMKF Sustainability Committee member Sean Edwards. 50% from Mr. Edwards’ art bought through referrals from the BMKF directly supports the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation Scholarships. Contact us for more details.

To see more of Ray Lawrence Edwards’ art please visit: http://www.zhibit.org/rayedwardsartwork


Sally Wager

Sally Wager is a graduate of the New York Botanical Garden’s Botanical Art and Illustration Certification program. She moved to the Northwest and was able to create her own English garden, which has provided her with endless hours of inspiration for her botanical paintings. Her great love of nature and her passion for gardening and the wonder and beauty of it is expressed in her paintings.

Some of her paintings are shown here. They may be purchased as an 8.5″ x 11″ print of the original watercolor painting or as a set of five 4.25” X 5.5” cards.

The print is printed on acid-free archival paper using vibrant archival quality inks to preserve the detail of the original watercolor painting. It arrives signed and dated on the back by the the artist, and is enclosed in an archival clear plastic bag with cardboard backing to prevent damage during shipping.

Each 4.25″ X 5.5″ card is blank inside and comes individually sealed in a plastic bag. They are printed on high quality matte paper and come with envelopes.

Prints are sold for $20 and a set of five cards sells for $10. 20% of all sales is donated to Bo M Karlsson Foundation.

Please contact Sally Wager at Sunshowerstudio@gmail.com if you wish to order or enquire about other images. Payment can be made by PayPal.


Louma El-Khoury

Fashion Illustrator

www.pokidots.com

Louma El-Khoury is a Seattle fashion illustrator and mom of two little girls. Originally from Lebanon, Louma studied fashion design in Montreal and later specialized in fashion illustration. She also creates custom keepsakes with children’s outgrown baby clothes that hold precious memories and special milestones. You can see samples of her work in coffee shops around Seattle, and soon in children’s stores.

10% from Ms. El-Khoury’s keepsakes commissioned through referrals from the BMKF directly supports the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation Scholarships.

“Nepalese Bride” was designed by Louma exclusively for BMKF. 100% from sales of this particular artwork supports our scholarships.


Ellyn Norris

Photo Artist

www.ellynism.com

Ellyn Norris is a Canadian photo artist who has been living in San Diego, California since 2000. She graduated with a bachelor of Fine Arts from Concordia University in Montreal and completed a master of Art Education at NSCAD University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She has been a photography instructor at various colleges in San Diego, on campus and online, since 2001. “Elle” has traveled the world extensively to pursue her passion of Landscape and Humanitarian photography. Ellyn also hosts Photography tours of Iceland and Nepal each year.

To see more of Ellyn Norris work, please visit her website www.ellynism.com

20% from Ms. Norris photographs bought through referrals from the BMKF directly supports the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation Scholarships. Contact us for more details.


Sterling Silver Jewelry by Rajman Bajracharya inspired by BMKF Scholars

About the Artist

Nepalese-born Rajman Bajracharya worked many years carving statues before switching to silver. His beautiful pieces are painstakingly made and carved by hand using mostly handmade tools. Rajman works as an accountant to make a living but designing jewelry has become his hobby and passion. He truly enjoys creating exquisite jewelry and it gives him immense satisfaction when people love his creations. “I get my energy from people liking my designs”, Rajman says.
photo: Scott Squire

About the Jewelry

Over the years, the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation has auctioned many of Rajman Bajracharya’s pieces at various fundraising events and they have always been very popular, sought-after items. In 2011 BMKF commissioned Mr. Bajracharya to create pieces inspired by the first BMKF graduates Bindu Shrestha, Grishma Manandhar, Shanta Sapkota, Kanchhi Sherpa, and Sarita Tamang.

All net proceeds go to fund our scholarships. Please contact Sonnia Karlsson sjk73@msn.com for more information.

“Bindu” bracelet
inspired by BMKF alumna Bindu Shrestha (Nursing 2007)
$125.00
“Shanta” ring
inspired by BMKF alumna Shanta Sapkota (Education 2011)
$70.00
“Sarita” necklace
inspired by BMKF alumna Sarita Tamang (Journalism 2011)
$195.00
“Kanchhi” pendant
inspired by BMKF alumna Kanchhi Sherpa (Education 2011)
$75.00
“Grishma” earrings
inspired by BMKF alumna Grishma Manandhar (Mechanical Engineering 2011)
$65.00

BMKF 12th ANNIVERSARY PEACOCK JEWELRY

On March 18, 2016, the Bo M. Karlsson turned 12 years old. To commemorate the occasion and raise funds for the BMKF Scholarship program, we commissioned Rajman Bajracharya to create the Bo M. Karlsson Foundation Ring and Pendant.

We chose the peacock motif to represent our mission and vision. A sacred bird revered in Nepal, the peacock symbolizes integrity, nobility, holiness, guidance, and protection, as well as prosperity and good luck. Gorgeous carvings of this beautiful bird decorate the Newar windows of Nepalese palaces, temples, and private residences.
Associated with both Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of wealth, fortune, and prosperity, and Saraswati, goddess of knowledge, music, art, wisdom and learning, the peacock represents what we can achieve when we show our true colors.

To purchase a Bo M. Karlsson Foundation ring or pendant and help support higher education for women in Nepal, please contact Sonnia Karlsson at sjk73@msn.com.

Peacock pendant: $45
Peacock ring: $95